Motorsport

28 minutes ago

MotorSport New Zealand

We'll head to the other end of the country for the final #FIAVolunteersWeekend profile with Caroline Cullimore, who with partner Tony Adamson, is a core member of the Highlands Motorsport Club, Cromwell.

How did you get started in motorsport?
Both Tony and I went to a meeting about getting the Queenstown Car Club back up and running. Being the only female there I was elected to be the secretary(!) and Tony was elected onto the committee. From there, we helped get the club back up and running, and got Coronet Peak Hill climb back on the motorsport calendar. In 2012 the QCC was invited to help run the opening of the Highlands Motorsport Park. What a great event, a celebration of New Zealand motorsports through the eras. From that event, Tony and I began working with the Highlands staff to start organising their next big event, and have been volunteering for Highlands ever since.
What’s your current passion and commitment?
It’s not the money and sex; it is the enjoyment of challenging ourselves. We invested in a Evo 2 for rallying on gravel and it is fair to say we are still beginners. We are now on our second Evo 2 as we had a mishap on the Catlins Rally and the 1st Evo came off second best. That didn’t stop us! We use the Evo for hillclimbs and have recently been using a Suzuki Swift for rallies, which has been quite successful. I have enjoyed co-driving with Grant Aitken in Targa NZ and with Tony in the Catlins and Lawrence rallies.

We thoroughly enjoy running and being involved with the events at the Highlands. Knowing we have been part of a team that have run such successful events makes us feel proud and hope to be part of future events.
Tony and I are both bronze Clerks of the Course, which is fun running ClubSport events. Tony is also an A grade scrutineer and I do the race secretary role. We are both committed to helping and competing in motorsport in all levels of the sport.

What do you get out of volunteering in motorsport?
We enjoy volunteering, because of the great feeling you get at the end of each event, you can be proud that all went well and the competitors have had a great weekend. Being race secretary it is always a challenge to make sure all the entries have been collated correctly – the build-up starts months before, especially if it is an international event. On the day of the event I enjoy being part of the pit lane excitement and getting to know the drivers. Tony is in control of pit lane and organising the race volunteers, which is a big job getting 50-100 race volunteers committed and organised to cover all positions on the track and pit lane.

Tell us a bit about your club?
We’re members of the Highlands Motorsport Club, which is in a better position than most, as we don’t have the pressure to be as financial as most clubs. We run training and volunteer reward days at the Highlands Motorsport Park for track volunteers, introduce new drivers to our own sprint series. Affiliated to Motorsport NZ, we are able to provide the permits, etc. required for all the race events at the Highlands Motorsport Park.

As a volunteer, approx. how many events have you been involved with over the past year (or all your years of volunteering)?
Both Tony and I have volunteered for basic ClubSport events, national and local rally events, as well as large international race events from 2008 till 2016. In those 8 years, we have learnt a lot and like to share our expertise to new race competitors.
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Well head to the other end of the country for the final #FIAVolunteersWeekend profile with Caroline Cullimore, who with partner Tony Adamson, is a core member of the Highlands Motorsport Club, Cromwell.

How did you get started in motorsport?
Both Tony and I went to a meeting about getting the Queenstown Car Club back up and running. Being the only female there I was elected to be the secretary(!) and Tony was elected onto the committee. From there, we helped get the club back up and running, and got Coronet Peak Hill climb back on the motorsport calendar. In 2012 the QCC was invited to help run the opening of the Highlands Motorsport Park. What a great event, a celebration of New Zealand motorsports through the eras. From that event, Tony and I began working with the Highlands staff to start organising their next big event, and have been volunteering for Highlands ever since.
What’s your current passion and commitment?
It’s not the money and sex; it is the enjoyment of challenging ourselves. We invested in a Evo 2 for rallying on gravel and it is fair to say we are still beginners. We are now on our second Evo 2 as we had a mishap on the Catlins Rally and the 1st Evo came off second best. That didn’t stop us! We use the Evo for hillclimbs and have recently been using a Suzuki Swift for rallies, which has been quite successful. I have enjoyed co-driving with Grant Aitken in Targa NZ and with Tony in the Catlins and Lawrence rallies.
  
We thoroughly enjoy running and being involved with the events at the Highlands. Knowing we have been part of a team that have run such successful events makes us feel proud and hope to be part of future events. 
Tony and I are both bronze Clerks of the Course, which is fun running ClubSport events. Tony is also an A grade scrutineer and I do the race secretary role. We are both committed to helping and competing in motorsport in all levels of the sport.

What do you get out of volunteering in motorsport? 
We enjoy volunteering, because of the great feeling you get at the end of each event, you can be proud that all went well and the competitors have had a great weekend. Being race secretary it is always a challenge to make sure all the entries have been collated correctly – the build-up starts months before, especially if it is an international event. On the day of the event I enjoy being part of the pit lane excitement and getting to know the drivers. Tony is in control of pit lane and organising the race volunteers, which is a big job getting 50-100 race volunteers committed and organised to cover all positions on the track and pit lane.  

Tell us a bit about your club?
We’re members of the Highlands Motorsport Club, which is in a better position than most, as we don’t have the pressure to be as financial as most clubs. We run training and volunteer reward days at the Highlands Motorsport Park for track volunteers, introduce new drivers to our own sprint series. Affiliated to Motorsport NZ, we are able to provide the permits, etc. required for all the race events at the Highlands Motorsport Park.

As a volunteer, approx. how many events have you been involved with over the past year (or all your years of volunteering)? 
Both Tony and I have volunteered for basic ClubSport events, national and local rally events, as well as large international race events from 2008 till 2016. In those 8 years, we have learnt a lot and like to share our expertise to new race competitors.

36 minutes ago

Supercars

Battling right to the flag for the win.

We'll be in good hands in a few years when these Super3 young guns hit the big time.
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Comment on Facebook

Emily Duggan and Madeline Stewart both in the top 10! Great work girls 😁

Let's continue #FIAVolunteersWeekend with a chat with Campbell Robertson – competitor, steward, CRO

Generous with his time and wise with his words, Campbell Robertson has contributed to New Zealand motorsport on many levels across the years.

How long have you been involved with motorsport?
I first got involved in non-affiliated motorsport in 1977 when we bought a Fiat 125 and joined the Waikato Fiat Club Waikato. They were not a member of MANZ (now MSNZ) then but we did motorkhanas and trials to local rules. Very soon the desire to play properly came along.

How did you start – as a competitor, club member, volunteer, official or…?
Yes! Joined FCW as a member and started playing at their events, very low key but clearly bitten. At the next AGM for the club I was on the committee and basically have never been away from it. That meant I was a competitor, club member and volunteer as we helped Hamilton Car Club as a timing crew and block marshalling rallies and of course, someone had to run even our own low key events. My first ‘proper’ competition came when I was encouraged to do a few hillclimbs, so I joined Hamilton Car Club so I could get a licence (about 1982/1983, test done with the late Keith Speedy). That led to me using our daily driver X1/9 for a few local events. Eventually my great mate Maurice Thomson suggested the club join MSNZ and so began the real adventure. That finally led to the top table for 10 years that I found enjoyable and challenging.

What inspired/encouraged you to get involved in the sport?
We knew no one in Hamilton when we arrived in 1977 for [wife] Joss’s new job, but we bought a Fiat 125 soon after arriving and I worked with another Fiat owner. He invited us to join the club and it was a perfect opportunity to meet new people and learn our way around the Waikato. Little did we know…

What’s your current passion or commitment?
My long-held passion for Italian vehicles continues unabated. I race Piglet too infrequently with the Trofeo Series (a wonderful group of Italiophiles who use racing as an excuse to get together, eat good food and drink Italian wine). My commitment to the sport is as the Area 2 Permit Issuing Steward, a role that can be quite time consuming but satisfying when it all works well. I continue with a strong passion and commitment to ClubSport, although I don’t compete enough there and I tend to enjoy it mainly through stewarding.

What challenges and opportunities do you see for officials such as CROs in the future?
I can see that CROs will continued to be challenged by the demands of the more professional teams running at major meetings throughout the country. They remain as volunteers – obviously – but will need to ensure their knowledge remains absolutely current and they will need to ensure they are diligent in their role of being both a conduit and at times a shield for the Clerk of the Course/Race Director, etc. The greatest opportunity is to be a trusted official in the eyes of both the race/rally officials and their customers being the competitors and entrants at meetings. It’s a great role that demands the ultimate in diplomatic skills at times, and the ability to be a trusted advisor for the competitors.

What challenges and opportunities do you see for the sport as a whole?
Our sport has a range of challenges ahead in my view. There has been a total change in the way circuits are operated and we will need to change how we (clubs in particular) interact with these commercial entities. However, we need to ensure that our sport can continue to appeal to more people so entry cost has to remain attainable. Stars such as Hayden, Mitch, Scott, Brendon, Earl, SVG, Scott M, Emma, Mad Mike, et al are attracting more attention to a wider part of our sport; it isn’t all circuit stuff or all rally stuff. People are starting to recognise we are quite good at this and that money is our biggest hurdle to world recognition. Somewhere/how we have to find a way of getting more corporate support inside New Zealand and beyond our borders. The opportunities are boundless as shown by exactly the same people mentioned above. Another major challenge and opportunity is attracting and keeping more women as competitors and supporting their career aspirations exactly as we do for men. It is an unfortunate fact that some of our most successful women are the ones who are never seen, our volunteers who make sure we have people to run events. Rally HQ at RNZ and any event is usually dominated by females, but often not in the top job. Deb Day is certainly trying to change that for racing.

As a volunteer or official, approx. how many events have you been involved with over the past year
Goodness, that is a good question. Obviously I have a minor involvement with anything in Area 2 that requires a Permit - everything. I think I have probably atewarded 8-10 events in our own area from ClubSport events through to national race meetings and at least one rally, and several at Hampton Downs which we share with the Area 1 guys. I have competed too few times but that is my own fault.
... See MoreSee Less

Lets continue #FIAVolunteersWeekend with a chat with Campbell Robertson – competitor, steward, CRO

Generous with his time and wise with his words, Campbell Robertson has contributed to New Zealand motorsport on many levels across the years.

How long have you been involved with motorsport? 
I first got involved in non-affiliated motorsport in 1977 when we bought a Fiat 125 and joined the Waikato Fiat Club Waikato. They were not a member of MANZ (now MSNZ) then but we did motorkhanas and trials to local rules. Very soon the desire to play properly came along.

How did you start – as a competitor, club member, volunteer, official or…? 
Yes! Joined FCW as a member and started playing at their events, very low key but clearly bitten. At the next AGM for the club I was on the committee and basically have never been away from it. That meant I was a competitor, club member and volunteer as we helped Hamilton Car Club as a timing crew and block marshalling rallies and of course, someone had to run even our own low key events. My first ‘proper’ competition came when I was encouraged to do a few hillclimbs, so I joined Hamilton Car Club so I could get a licence (about 1982/1983, test done with the late Keith Speedy). That led to me using our daily driver X1/9 for a few local events. Eventually my great mate Maurice Thomson suggested the club join MSNZ and so began the real adventure. That finally led to the top table for 10 years that I found enjoyable and challenging.

What inspired/encouraged you to get involved in the sport? 
We knew no one in Hamilton when we arrived in 1977 for [wife] Joss’s new job, but we bought a Fiat 125 soon after arriving and I worked with another Fiat owner. He invited us to join the club and it was a perfect opportunity to meet new people and learn our way around the Waikato. Little did we know…
 
What’s your current passion or commitment? 
My long-held passion for Italian vehicles continues unabated. I race Piglet too infrequently with the Trofeo Series (a wonderful group of Italiophiles who use racing as an excuse to get together, eat good food and drink Italian wine). My commitment to the sport is as the Area 2 Permit Issuing Steward, a role that can be quite time consuming but satisfying when it all works well. I continue with a strong passion and commitment to ClubSport, although I don’t compete enough there and I tend to enjoy it mainly through stewarding.

What challenges and opportunities do you see for officials such as CROs in the future? 
I can see that CROs will continued to be challenged by the demands of the more professional teams running at major meetings throughout the country. They remain as volunteers – obviously – but will need to ensure their knowledge remains absolutely current and they will need to ensure they are diligent in their role of being both a conduit and at times a shield for the Clerk of the Course/Race Director, etc. The greatest opportunity is to be a trusted official in the eyes of both the race/rally officials and their customers being the competitors and entrants at meetings. It’s a great role that demands the ultimate in diplomatic skills at times, and the ability to be a trusted advisor for the competitors.

What challenges and opportunities do you see for the sport as a whole? 
Our sport has a range of challenges ahead in my view. There has been a total change in the way circuits are operated and we will need to change how we (clubs in particular) interact with these commercial entities. However, we need to ensure that our sport can continue to appeal to more people so entry cost has to remain attainable. Stars such as Hayden, Mitch, Scott, Brendon, Earl, SVG, Scott M, Emma, Mad Mike, et al are attracting more attention to a wider part of our sport; it isn’t all circuit stuff or all rally stuff. People are starting to recognise we are quite good at this and that money is our biggest hurdle to world recognition. Somewhere/how we have to find a way of getting more corporate support inside New Zealand and beyond our borders. The opportunities are boundless as shown by exactly the same people mentioned above. Another major challenge and opportunity is attracting and keeping more women as competitors and supporting their career aspirations exactly as we do for men. It is an unfortunate fact that some of our most successful women are the ones who are never seen, our volunteers who make sure we have people to run events. Rally HQ at RNZ and any event is usually dominated by females, but often not in the top job. Deb Day is certainly trying to change that for racing.

As a volunteer or official, approx. how many events have you been involved with over the past year
Goodness, that is a good question. Obviously I have a minor involvement with anything in Area 2 that requires a Permit - everything. I think I have probably atewarded 8-10 events in our own area from ClubSport events through to national race meetings and at least one rally, and several at Hampton Downs which we share with the Area 1 guys. I have competed too few times but that is my own fault.
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